April 12, 2024

Rock art preservation, research conference hosted at CEU

College of Eastern Utah’s students and faculty are invited to join several hundred rock art enthusiasts from Utah and out of state this weekend (October 7-10), for the 25th annual Utah Rock Art and Research Association symposium. The conference provides an in depth look at rock art research and preservation issues.

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College of Eastern Utah’s students and faculty are invited to join several hundred rock art enthusiasts from Utah and out of state this weekend (October 7-10), for the 25th annual Utah Rock Art and Research Association symposium. The conference provides an in depth look at rock art research and preservation issues.
URARA’s President, Troy Scotter, said that the group chose Price because of the proximity of the city to many important rock art sites including the famous Nine-Mile Canyon. Scotter stated that URARA members want to survey the impact of energy development on rock art in Nine-Mile Canyon.
URARA is a nonprofit organization, which encourages research in the field of rock art and works for the protection and preservation of rock art sites. The four-day conference includes 19 presentations on prehistoric rock art, evening socials and field trips to Nine-Mile Canyon, the San Rafael Swell and the Green River area.
Friday evening, tools sessions for rock art researchers includes: Intermediate Photoshop, Topographical Map Visualization and How to Select a Digital Camera. These workshops begin at 7:30 p.m. in the multipurpose room in the CEU Student Center.
Saturday morning the keynote speaker Polly Schaafsma, a recognized expert in southwestern rock art, will speak on “Rock Art and Conflict in the Prehistoric Southwest.” She recently authored “Warrior, Shield and Star: Imagery and Ideology of Pueblo Warfare, AD 1250-1600,” a vivid portrayal of how ancestral Pueblo peoples may have viewed warfare within the context of their daily lives.
Saturday afternoon’s keynote speaker Dr. Ray Matheny, a BYU archeologist specializing in Fremont rock art, will discuss “Nine-Mile Canyon Rock Art and Fremont Survival Strategies.” He is the editor of a new book, “New Dimensions in Rock Art Studies.”
Sunday morning, the featured speaker is Wyoming archeologist, Dr. Julie Francis presenting “Rock Art, Social Boundaries and Ancient History in the Bighorn and Wind River Basins of Wyoming.” These presentations and humanities scholar David Susac’s presentation, “Mixed Metaphor? – Composite Figures in Barrier Style Rock Art” are free and open to the pubic. Students who attend the conference may receive academic credit. Contact Pam Miller for further information.
CEU students and faculty with I.D. will be admitted to any presentation free of charge. The entire event, which includes socials and field trips, is available to the public for a nominal fee. Registration is at the CEU Student Center Multipurpose Room October 7, Friday 4 – 6 p.m., or October 8, Saturday at 7:30 a.m.
For information: w.w.w. utahrockart.org or (801) 583-4353.Rock art preservation, research conference hosted at CEU