May 28, 2024

Rock art to whale watching lectures scheduled in museum

From rock art in New Mexico to whale watching and Inca culture, the Castle Valley Archeology Society has two lectures scheduled in March and April adding an eclectic dimension to its usual third week of the month lecture.
A slide presentation on the Flaming Crown Rock Art From New Mexico will be presented by the education director at the Edge of the Cedars State Park on Thursday, March 20 at 7 p.m. in the College of Eastern Utah Prehistoric Museum’s classroom.

From rock art in New Mexico to whale watching and Inca culture, the Castle Valley Archeology Society has two lectures scheduled in March and April adding an eclectic dimension to its usual third week of the month lecture.
A slide presentation on the Flaming Crown Rock Art From New Mexico will be presented by the education director at the Edge of the Cedars State Park on Thursday, March 20 at 7 p.m. in the College of Eastern Utah Prehistoric Museum’s classroom.
A photography show of Whale Watching and Inca Culture is the second lecture series offered on Thursday, April 17 at 7 p.m. in the museum classroom.
Nature photographer, Francois Gohier, has been based in San Diego, Calif., since 1988. He grew up in the Basque Country in Southwest France, where he developed an interest for nature and photography while hiking and climbing in the Pyrenees, the mountain range between France and Spain.
He studied mathematics and physics but after taking a class of natural history photography with the photo and cinema service at the National Museum in Paris, he decided to travel and document the natural world and spent several years in South America.
While sailing in the Gulf of California in 1977, Francois met Dr. Theodore Walker, a specialist of the California Gray whale, and later joined him on trips to Laguna San Ignacio in Baja California, Mexico. Since then Francois has returned to Baja California almost every winter.
He has photographed marine mammals along the coasts of North and South America, Australia and Europe. Francois has also spent a great deal of time visiting and photographing archaeological sites in the Southwestern US, and in South America.
Castle Valley Archeology Society sponsors lectors on the third Thursday of each month, said Christin K. Trease, museum public relations director. The museum is located at 155 East Main Street. The lectures are free of charge and open to the public.