July 28, 2021

Anti-science rant

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This archived article was written by: Nathaniel Woodward

Nathaniel Woodward
Managing editor

It’s a hard time to be educated these days, let alone to be a scientist. The “meme generation” is upon us which encompasses both young and old alike. This generation of one-to- two-line researchers take all the information they require on a topic from a clever picture with a short description and share that picture with their group of friends. If each person shares any particular meme with just five friends, that sequence would only need to happen 14 times before it reaches every person on the planet, a scary prospect if that meme is outrightly wrong.
In the world of “info wars,” David Avocado Wolfe, Jenny McCarthy and the Food Babe lines are drawn in the sand deeper and more aggressively than ever behind non-issues and pseudoscience. This article will win me few friends, but the truth hurts and you’re about to get a dose of it.
Aspartame does not cause cancer. I have absolutely no idea who thought it did but there isn’t a single scientific study that shows any link between the two. Gluten is not bad for you unless you have Celiac disease. There is no “sensitivity” to gluten outside of that specific disease, avoiding gluten is trendy, not scientific. Superfoods do not exists. Food and drinks with extra vitamins are just the ingredients for expensive urine, sorry. Vaccines do not cause autism. a medical doctor showing the link was debunked years ago, resulting in severe consequences for the doctor who fabricated his tests.
You cannot do a “cleanse” to rid you body of “toxins.” You’re body does that for free, its called having a liver. GMO’s are not dangerous. There have been nearly 3,000 scientific studies published, not a one shows any link between a genetically modified crop and negative health effects.
This is my shortlist of non-issues that so many google university scientists continually scream about without any actual understanding of even the most basic sciences. If you read a meme or article from one of these biased sources, there is nothing wrong with that, just continue your research through sources who rely on much more than anecdotal evidence and “feelings,” none of which are sources of actual evidence.
This article may fall under a rant category, but we just elected a president who believes many of these scientific false-hoods and should be held accountable for the conspiracy theory nonsense he may inadvertently advance.

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