Wed. Oct 23rd, 2019

Learning life lessons in sports

I have been around sports for as long as I can remember and have been taught valuable lessons that have helped me become a better employee, friend and citizen.   I want to share a bit of this knowledge brought by coaches, teammates and the soul of the game that I competed in.

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This archived article was written by: Robert Hanson

I have been around sports for as long as I can remember and have been taught valuable lessons that have helped me become a better employee, friend and citizen.   I want to share a bit of this knowledge brought by coaches, teammates and the soul of the game that I competed in.
First off, there are those who know and those that are willing to learn.   A knowing person has his or her ideas on how the game is best played and will not compromise with anyone who might contradict that belief.   A learner is one who knows how the game is played (or doesn’t have a clue), but is willing to take criticism or the ideas of others on a test run.   Even if the new knowledge doesn’t work for them, they gave it a try and are better athletes for the effort.  
In all aspects of life, it is best to be willing to learn, because no matter how much you know, there will always be someone that knows of a better way.
Then, once you submit yourself to being able to take advice from others and apply it into your game (or life), you will have to work in order to stay ahead of the competition, and work hard.  
Everyone is working on their game (some are working harder than the rest), and they all want you to lose (either the game or your position).   Therefore to be a standout athlete and a valuable member of your team,   you have to put forth more effort than the rest.   You know this makes you a better employee, but putting in extra effort also helps on the playing field of friendship as well.
Now, a little story from my weekend is in order.   I was making a trip with Shaun Keith to my home in West Valley, when the truck we were using ran out of fluid in the clutch and we were unable to shift.   Since neither of us had any money on us, I gave a good friend and teammate, Clad Reeve, from my high school days a call.   Upon getting the call, he dropped what he was doing at that moment and drove out to help us.   He lent me some money for the necessary repairs to get the truck moving again.   I feel that he will be a friend for life, because of his willingness to sacrifice his time to come to my aid.   And I would do the same for him or any of my past, present or future friends and teammates.

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