March 2, 2021

Some survivor kits are better

Leave it to marketing to take the perfect out of a perfectly good idea.
Still, if you don’t know better, the $19.95 Lifeline Ultimate Survivor in a Bottle looks like a deliciously sensible investment in wilderness safety.
Peer through the sides of the blue plastic bottle, and you can plainly see the survival items tucked inside, safe from rain or a dunking.
_ Matches. Good.
_ A small candle. Excellent.
_ A combination compass, whistle and signal mirror. Useful.
_ An emergency blanket. A fine potential shelter.

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This archived article was written by: Craig Medred

Leave it to marketing to take the perfect out of a perfectly good idea.
Still, if you don’t know better, the $19.95 Lifeline Ultimate Survivor in a Bottle looks like a deliciously sensible investment in wilderness safety.
Peer through the sides of the blue plastic bottle, and you can plainly see the survival items tucked inside, safe from rain or a dunking.
_ Matches. Good.
_ A small candle. Excellent.
_ A combination compass, whistle and signal mirror. Useful.
_ An emergency blanket. A fine potential shelter.
_ A small first aid kit. Probably unnecessary, but who can’t use a Band-Aid now and then.
_ A compact multi-tool.Better than nothing, though a good, lightweight knife would be more useful for slicing fire shavings, or cutting and shaping limbs for shelter poles, splints, snowshoes or who knows what.
_ A couple handwarmer packets. Handy for getting cold fingers working again.
_ An aluminum flashlight with two AA batteries? A lot of weight to carry to perform a task many compact LED lights accomplish at a fraction of the size and weight.
_ A carabiner. Nothing but show.
_ A rain poncho. Who needs it?
What do you most need to survive the backcountry in addition to heat and shelter? That thing you need?
Water.

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