Mon. Oct 21st, 2019

We know it but do we care

Culture, professionalism and class have lost their meaning in the theatre, apparently. The student government had asked to scream the school chant after a performance of the Lunch Hour directed by Corey Ewan Ph.D. They must not have heard the definite, “No” from a member of the theatre department, because they proceeded to scream anyway. Luckily, the personages of class and theatre etiquette had slipped out at intermission only to be replaced by their friends: arrogance and thoughtlessness, because the former personages may have been deeply offended.

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This archived article was written by: Zak Kanakis

Culture, professionalism and class have lost their meaning in the theatre, apparently. The student government had asked to scream the school chant after a performance of the Lunch Hour directed by Corey Ewan Ph.D. They must not have heard the definite, “No” from a member of the theatre department, because they proceeded to scream anyway. Luckily, the personages of class and theatre etiquette had slipped out at intermission only to be replaced by their friends: arrogance and thoughtlessness, because the former personages may have been deeply offended.
I’ve never really thought to start a chant during a play performance, though now it only makes sense- that is how you close out such an awe-inspiring production. Instead of the school chant, it may have been more acceptable to cheer staples of , “Be aggressive,” complete with spelling. For a play about passion adultery and chasing what you think you want, really is a lot like professional sports if you think about it, and the cheer could have brought a feeling of togetherness to all in the audience. Now that I think about it, the audience should be allowed to yell at the actors during the performances, as well. Nobody knows the plays better than the audience and I think this could propel the actors into a new dimension of their art.
When rubber hits the road, a thoughtless act actually made a big difference, as it robbed the actors of the credit. It’s like walking into the art gallery and placing stickers all over the art stating that this is “Property of CEU.” While the actors are a part of CEU, the production was their art and is then autonomous from the institute itself. The play became theirs and the credit was taken away for that brief moment as they were called out by the student government. I have not yet seen a formal apology issued.
If you want school morale then it would make sense that to, instead of forcing others to join in on high tide Wednesday or making sure that people know rhetoric for school propaganda, improve the small things within the school. For example, fixing the odd odor and the heating in Sessions hall or planning activities other than stomps? Morale is something that comes from a good rapport with the students, not from being their babysitter.

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2 thoughts on “We know it but do we care

  1. Comment
    Although there is a need for etiquette in theatre productions I’m sure that there was no intent of disruption of the performance. Lets just take a deep breath and try not to get so worked up.

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