April 6, 2020

Are resolutions resolute?

The new year has come and, with it, the resolutions are made. They’re endless, they’re hopeful and they’re somewhat improbable.
Dictionary.com defines resolution as, “A resolve or determination: to make a firm resolution to do something.”
How long, in actuality, do they last? Kristen Zarucchi, College of Eastern Utah student said, “I really want to commit to it. I want to do it the whole year. A resolution isn’t something that you plan on dumping once the year is through, it’s obviously something you want to get rid of.”

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This archived article was written by: Mae Goss

The new year has come and, with it, the resolutions are made. They’re endless, they’re hopeful and they’re somewhat improbable.
Dictionary.com defines resolution as, “A resolve or determination: to make a firm resolution to do something.”
How long, in actuality, do they last? Kristen Zarucchi, College of Eastern Utah student said, “I really want to commit to it. I want to do it the whole year. A resolution isn’t something that you plan on dumping once the year is through, it’s obviously something you want to get rid of.”
When making new year’s resolutions some make only one, settling with only improving one thing at a time; whereas others take on an entire list. “I’m afraid of disappointing myself so I don’t make any,” CEU student Shea Sperry said. A wise move, some would say. Benjamin Franklin said, “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.”
Ashlie Nacey, CEU student, takes a more lasting approach: “I don’t believe in New Year’s resolutions. You should have on-going goals throughout the year because, about the middle of February, people just dump their resolutions.”
Are the resolutions things that people actually want to do or are they something that is just “what’s done?” Tanner Snow said, “I don’t think they work because most people just don’t care to continue them. They just make one for the sake of making one because it’s expected. They don’t set deadlines for their goals. They say, ‘I want to lose ten pounds,’ but they don’t say when they want that accomplished.”
While some resolutions are small everyday things, some are outlandish and not necessarily accomplishable. Michael S. Johnson said, “People just don’t know the difference between a dream and a goal. They need to be more realistic.”
Several people make the same resolutions. Tellinitlikeitis.net states as their top ten New Year’s Resolutions, “10. Volunteer to help others, 9. Going greener, 8. Reduce stress, 7. Get a better education, 6. Eat right/Get fit, 5. Quit smoking, 4. Spend more time with family, 3. Get a better job, 2. Manage debt/save money, 1. Lose weight.”
Many of these may look familiar to those resolution-makers so, just goes to show, they aren’t alone.

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