May 31, 2020

Huffington Post’s “You’re out: 20 things that became obsolete this decade

Ever gone through your parents’ baby book and saw something you’ve only ever seen in a museum? Well, this new generation will be saying the same thing about some things you grew up with.
An article in Yahoo! Finance, referring to an article in the Huffington Post called “You’re Out: 20 Things That Became Obsolete This Decade,” said, “It’s a great retrospective on the technology leaps we’ve made since the new century began, and it got me thinking about the difference today’s technology will make in the lives of tomorrow’s kids.”

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This archived article was written by: Mae Goss

Ever gone through your parents’ baby book and saw something you’ve only ever seen in a museum? Well, this new generation will be saying the same thing about some things you grew up with.
An article in Yahoo! Finance, referring to an article in the Huffington Post called “You’re Out: 20 Things That Became Obsolete This Decade,” said, “It’s a great retrospective on the technology leaps we’ve made since the new century began, and it got me thinking about the difference today’s technology will make in the lives of tomorrow’s kids.”
It’s true that technology has changed so much in so little time. These are many things that are likely to become unknown to future generations:
VCRs and VHS tapes: In 2005 the Washington Post published a faux obituary for VHS tapes, saying, “VHS – the beloved videotape format that bravely won the war against Betamax and charmed millions of Americans by allowing them to enjoy mindless Hollywood entertainment without leaving their homes – has died at the age of 29. It passed away peacefully after a long illness caused by chronic technological insignificance and a lack or director’s commentary tracks.”
Travel agents: Why would you pay someone to plan a vacation for you when you can do it for yourself on the web?
The separation between work life and personal life: With all the new technology, smartphones especially, it’s going to nigh impossible for the thin line between work and personal life to exist.
Forgetting: The New York Times published an article earlier this year which said, “The web means the end of forgetting . . . The Internet records everything and forgets nothing.” From old school friends to your next dentist appointment, you will be less likely to forget with the web on your side.
Bookstores: a Yahoo! Finance article said, “Like [the] video tape, words written on dead trees are on their way out. Sure, there may be books – but for those born today, stores that exist solely to sell them will be as numerous as record stores are now.”
Watches: Why carry something around on your wrist to tell the time when your cell phone will tell you a more accurate time. Plus, you always have your phone on you anyway, right?
Maps: These things will surely be considered clutter when your GPS will be able to do the same thing and not get ripped or crumpled.
Classifieds in newspapers: As with travel agents so many things are at the touch of your fingertips. Craigslist is one of websites to take the place of the newspaper classifieds section.
Dial-up internet: Why go back to the older, slower version when wi-fi allows you to go faster?
CDs: The digital world makes it so much easier to access all the music you want, without ever leaving your room.
Fax machines: Who uses them nowadays anyhow? E-mail is an easier alternative to them and much more efficient.
Hand-written letters: “For that matter, hand-written anything. When was the last time you wrote in cursive? In fact, do you even know what the word ‘cursive’ means? Kids born in 2011 won’t – but they’ll put you to shame on a tiny keyboard,” says Yahoo! Finance.
Calling: Why call when text-messaging, instant messaging, Tweeting, Facebook messaging and e-mailing can keep you in touch with everyone you need to?

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