Sat. Aug 24th, 2019

Resume recommendations

As spring semester winds down, many students are beginning to search for summer jobs. The difficulty of finding jobs is at an all-time high due to the high unemployment rate and the sluggish economy. Does this mean that you should abandon all hope of finding employment this summer? Of course not!
The simplest way to improve your chances of getting a job is to improve your resume. While your resume won’t guarantee you the job, it can get you in for an interview. This article will give you tips that can help you score a job that you will love.

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This archived article was written by: McKenzie Hosenfeld

As spring semester winds down, many students are beginning to search for summer jobs. The difficulty of finding jobs is at an all-time high due to the high unemployment rate and the sluggish economy. Does this mean that you should abandon all hope of finding employment this summer? Of course not!
The simplest way to improve your chances of getting a job is to improve your resume. While your resume won’t guarantee you the job, it can get you in for an interview. This article will give you tips that can help you score a job that you will love.
Lyndsay Reid, USU Eastern academic and career advisor, stresses the importance of making your application unique and interesting. She says, “Your resume should stand out from the rest because the average time an employer spends reading it is only 20 seconds.” You need to make that time count.
The cover letter plays a vital role in the success of a resume. Reid says, “Always include a cover letter, even if an employer doesn’t ask for one.” A cover letter should be a “summary of your resume and highlights on your most important traits, skills and accomplishments.” It is also important that the cover letter shows that the applicant researched the company before applying for a position.
The body of your resume should communicate your relevant experience for the job. Resumes should never lie or stretch the truth, but don’t sell yourself short- a little bragging is acceptable. Reid stresses that resumes look professional and mature by “staying away from cutesy clip art and fancy fonts.” It should visually appealing and simple to decipher.
The final part of your resume is the reference page. Reid recommends that an applicant has at least three to five references, which could include instructors, advisors, co-workers, manager and previous supervisors. She also suggests, “Don’t state, “References available upon request” at the end of your resume. It’s a given that you have references.” Give the employer a copy of your references, even if they don’t ask for one.
Lastly, a resume should be proofread before you turn it into the employer. Ask friends, family, or a professor to double check on grammar and spelling issues. Nothing makes you look less qualified for a position than glaring writing mistakes on your resume.
If you want to score that awesome job for this summer, begin at the root of all interviews: the resume. By simply devoting time to perfect your resume, you improve your likeliness of being contacted to interview. Your effort will be completely worth it in the end.

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