Sat. Aug 24th, 2019

The 2013 Clothesline Project at USU Eastern

Emily Williams
lifestyles editor
e.williams@eaglemail.ceu.edu
The Clothesline Project was on display in the Jenifer Leavitt Student Center Multi Purpose room. The project has become a major success thanks to the involvement of Eastern staff, faculty, and students, as well as overwhelming support from members of the community.

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This archived article was written by: Emily Williams

Emily Williams
lifestyles editor
e.williams@eaglemail.ceu.edu
The Clothesline Project was on display in the Jenifer Leavitt Student Center Multi Purpose room. The project has become a major success thanks to the involvement of Eastern staff, faculty, and students, as well as overwhelming support from members of the community.
Local organizations such as B.A.C.C.A, the Woman’s Shelter, and Four Corners are forming a partnership with Darrin Brandt, who spearheaded the project, to offer support to community members who have experienced any type of violence or abuse. Brandt feels it is important that people know that there are resources available in the community, and people who care and want to help.
This project raises awareness, and gives a voice to many individuals who suffer in silence. Similar to walking into a museum, the display is quiet and thought provoking. One B.A.C.C.A member noted that people walk in with a smile and walk out with a very solemn face. Brandt reports that many people have said that this display is so impact full. The most frequent comment he receives is simply “thank you.”
When inside the display, all one can hear are the symbolic sounds of the gongs, whistles and bells that represent the frequent abuse, sexual assault, and murder of women around the world, and quiet sniffling as viewers hold back tears. Brandt says, “I think they are just blown away.” “It touches your heart,” said an anonymous community member, as she began to cry.
On the first day of the display, April 16, over 100 people visited the display and 27 T-shirts were added to the clothesline. This more than doubled the amount of T-shirts that had been made all week. There were 175 shirts hung, many of which were contributed by Utah Valley University. Brandt believes that the number of shirts will increase so significantly that next year Eastern will no longer need extra shirts, but will display only locally made shirts.
Because of its overwhelming success, 1this project is going to become an annual tradition, and will most likely be held in conjunction with the women’s conference. Faye Lee, also known as Broken Wings, of the B.A.C.C.A association urges everyone to see the display each year. She says “Everyone needs to come out and read these t-shirts because [one of the shirts] may be the one that saves your child or your friend.”

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