September 18, 2020

The struggles of living off campus

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This archived article was written by: Katrina Wood

It’s about freedom and opportunities, cramming and making friends and it’s supposed to be one of the best times of your life. But it’s frustrating most often, you find yourself sitting alone.
Ah, the joys of living off campus. It’s got its perks, such as free food, access to a washer and dryer, a quiet place to study, roommates you’ve already learned how to deal with, and the privilege of not having to combat homesickness. Living locally supplies most of the college experience at a cheaper price, and without so many of those notorious “your roommate is throwing up at two in the morning on the carpet,” moments.
Indeed, at a first glance, it would seem like living off campus would be the ideal choice for most college students. With a bit more pocket change and a few more hours of sleep on your side, who would argue that living off campus would ever prove to be a bad thing? Though it’s a lovely idea at a first glance and filled with pluses that are impossible to ignore, living off campus harbors its share of disadvantages, most evident when it comes to making friends and socializing.
My first year of college was like most others. I was drowning in generals and making the transition from teenager to young adult. I was scared to reach out in the new and scary environment, so I relied on high school buddies to keep me strong. During my first semester, I was happy. I received As and high Bs in all my classes, got adequate sleep and enjoyed plenty of time with my friends. All in all, my first year of college was looking bright… until everyone started leaving.
Some fled for other schools. Several were called on missions. A few even got married. A handful dwindled, but for the most part, I was left watching as friend after friend went on to bigger and better things, leaving me to twiddle my thumbs and wonder what exactly I was supposed to do. I was never bothered that they were going on with their lives, but I was lonely.
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