Mon. Feb 24th, 2020

It’s time to get out of the “Rat Race”

USU Eastern’s Adventure Club feels at home

Getting outside and in touch with nature is a great way to relieve college stress. We are in a perfect area in the United States for all different kinds of exploring and venturing out to cool places. 

Porter George, Adventure Club president, says getting out and adventuring is one of his favorite things to share with others. 

He emphasizes how Adventure Club facilitates and helps others get outside and learn how to adventure. It inspires those who participate to want to get out and experience being outdoors more often. 

Getting outside helps him “get out of the rat race” of busy life. He also emphasized that being outside helps him have time to engage in his own thoughts and how to think more clearly.  

He says being outdoors in nature helps him keep his life balanced and helps him stay active. 

Porter and the club leave on weekends to go adventuring. They spend most of their free time in the outdoor industry and all that it has to offer. 

Some of the adventures they bring the Adventure Club on include: canyoneering, river rafting, rock climbing, ice climbing, bouldering, rappelling, snow shoeing, etc. 

Porter and others in the club are knowledgeable and competent in these and other ventures to help teach YOU how to love adventuring.

One of the things Porter and the Adventure Club do to enjoy outdooring is using the “Language of the Land,” as Porter calls it. 

-“Stoked”: excitement; anticipation

-“Gnarly”: super cool; impressive with a factor of fear

-“Bomber”: incredibly solid, used especially with rocks and crevices

-“Choss”: unstable, crumbly rock quality

-“Sketch”: general term for manageable risk or danger

-“Beta”: general term for insider information on a particular adventuring spot.

-“Sendy”: an adjective for anyone who adventures on a regular basis

-“Project”: anything that you spend an excessive amount of time on.

You often hear the Adventure Club members talking with this “Language of the Land” around campus when they talk about outdooring. The “Language of the Land” is all part of the culture and the experience of adventuring. 

 “I’m always ready for adventure,” he says. This is a popular lifestyle that keeps you active and engaged in a balanced life. Porter says he thinks everyone has something to learn from spending time outside. 

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