April 5, 2020

Edgar Allan Poe’s works on Friday the 13th

A reading by faculty, staff and students featuring the works of Edgar Allan Poe was a success on Feb. 13 at the Little Theater. The reading marked the 200th anniversary of the poet’s birth.
The reading, hosted on Friday the 13th, landed on a day appropriate for Poe. He wrote dark pieces that are fit for that day, which strangely, happens twice this year.

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This archived article was written by: Michael Ware

A reading by faculty, staff and students featuring the works of Edgar Allan Poe was a success on Feb. 13 at the Little Theater. The reading marked the 200th anniversary of the poet’s birth.
The reading, hosted on Friday the 13th, landed on a day appropriate for Poe. He wrote dark pieces that are fit for that day, which strangely, happens twice this year.
Poe was born in 1809. That makes this year his bicentennial. The reading was held after Susan Neel posted a poster celebrating his bicentennial, and finding that so many students had an interest in his works. No one knew there could have been so many Poe fans among the students and faculty.
“Villains! I shrieked, dissemble no more! I admit the deed! — tear up the planks! — here, here! — it is the beating of his hideous heart!” stated Krystle Noyes during her reading of the Tell-Tale Heart. It was the passion of the readers that made the reading a remarkable experience. The ambience of the dark theatre only added to it. When Poe’s works are read aloud, an appreciation is gained that cannot be achieved through reading the piece solely.
Six readers dressed in the gothic-like clothing fit for Poe’s reading. They read eight pieces for a packed house in the Little Theatre. Everyone attending the event received a red carnation. The stage was decorated reminiscent of the dark, eerie atmosphere that many of Poe’s work portrayed.
Neel introduced the evening speakers. Sonnet Gravina read Alone, Chapel Taylor read For Annie, Dream Within A Dream and Annabel Lee was read by Justin Wilde, The Tell-Tale Heart was read by Krystle Marie Noyes, The Bells and The Raven were read by Jason Olsen and The Fall of the House of Usher was read by Vanessa Hunt.

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