Thu. Oct 17th, 2019

Blast in the past … The Eagle 30 and 50 years ago

The College of Eastern Utah changed a great deal since its conception in 1937. However, many of the campus activities still remain the same.
The CEU library keeps a record of the college newspaper and has done so since 1947. With these records, light can be shed on the similarities and differences of the college over its history.

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This archived article was written by: Ryan Ware

The College of Eastern Utah changed a great deal since its conception in 1937. However, many of the campus activities still remain the same.
The CEU library keeps a record of the college newspaper and has done so since 1947. With these records, light can be shed on the similarities and differences of the college over its history.
The CEU newspaper’s name changed three times in its history. CEU’s paper has changed from the Carbonicle, to the Golden Eagle, to the current, The Eagle. the Carbonicle changed to the Golden Eagle because the high school and college split in 1957 when the new high school was built. The Carbonicle staff nearly halved in size because of the split. From 1935 – 1959 CEU’s newspaper was the Carbonicle, from 1960 – 1974 CEU’s paper was the Golden Eagle, and from 1975 to current, it has been The Eagle.
In 1947, which is the oldest CEU newspaper the library has on record, the Carbonicle had 34 students and an adviser, according to the 13th volume of the Carbonicle, first issue. Those 34 students created a newspaper that was four pages.
Compared to today, The Eagle only has decreased 20 students. In 1947, 252 students attend Carbon Jr. College. During this time, Carbon Jr. College was facing enrollment problems. A decrease of 15 students from the previous record-breaking year occurred that year. Today CEU has more than 2,000 students enrolled in all of its campuses.
CEU is the most expensive two-year college for the state to fund on a per-student basis. In 1978, college students paid 14 percent of the share of the total cost of college. The remainder of the cost comes from state funds. The fear of raising the burden to students is that enrollment rates will go down and funds for the college will go down.
Just 50 years ago, the staff shrank to just under 20 students, according to the 15th volume of the Carbonicle, 21st issue, which is similar to what is here today. Night classes started that year. Those classes included typewriting, … refresher shorthand, … office business machines.” Tuition at this time was only $17.50 plus $3.50 for every credit hour over five. According to the paper, “343 men and women” attended these classes and had “accounted for a large percentage of the school’s total enrollment.” Bizarre opening lines were used even 50 years ago.
Thirty years ago, the state’s budget for post-secondary education decreased, according to The Eagle, third volume, number six. The same arguments were made for and against tuition hikes. Those who were against the tuition hike argued “it would adversely affect enrollment and create worse budget woes.” CEU police bought their their first car.
In the over 70 years the college has been here, there have been challenges. In 1943, 27 full-time students attended all vocational programs at CEU. This was largely due to the peak of World War II. In 1953, the state of Utah wanted Carbon College to be shut down, and its assets to be sold. In order to prevent this move, 30,000 petition signatures were needed. The number actually obtained greatly exceeded the 30,000 petition signatures needed to keep the college. In 1964, Carbon College became the CEU.
In recent times, CEU faced numerous challenges, ranging from financial strains to merging with USU. Looking back 30, 50, or even 60-plus years ago, CEU has been through harder times and should weather the recent crisis as well.

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