Tue. Nov 12th, 2019

White Lady still roams the canyon

Keli Bera news editor


The view from the mouth of the “Devil’s Playhouse” in Spring Canyon.

“Who Ya Gonna Call?” Whether you believe in ghosts or turn your nose up, the many accounts, perspectives and twists have been applied to Carbon County’s tragic tale of The White Lady of Spring Canyon or as others may know her, The Lady of Latuda.

It all started with three-core factors: a husband killed, a woman left destitute and a child lost at the hands of misjudged mercy. But what is the real story?

Roughly seven to 10 mining settlements were established in what is now commonly known as Spring Canyon, located west of the historic town of Helper.

These establishments, (Peerless, Storrs (Spring Canyon’s original name), Standardville, Latuda and Rains to name a few) have all been jumbled in the legend of the White Lady.

Some accounts claim she wanders the road, looking for her baby, some claim she haunts the wash or nearby bridge and others say she resides in the ruins of a mining house, waiting for her husband and son to come home to her.

Now, one thing anyone failed to clarify was if the White Lady is in fact, a “Woman in White.” For all the supernatural/ horror-lore buffs, you know there is an interesting distinction, but for those who are in the dark about all this hubbub, a Woman in White is a spirit who was cheated on by her husband and went mad because of it, killing her children and then taking her own life as the tragic result. It is rumored that women in white is notorious for haunting the side of roadways and hitchhiking in cars in search of unfaithful men. The local White Lady follows this lore pretty closely, but not to a tee. However, the Latin American tale of La Llorona, or “the weeping woman” ts the description just a little better in this case.

In the time of early mining camps, the conditions were terrible. Accidents happened at such frequent rates, that sparse records of miners or their families were kept.

The White Lady of Latuda was rumored to be a wife to one of the miners who was killed in an accident along with their son. The accident left her, and her infant daughter, alone and she knew they would soon be turned out of their home (which was owned by the mine.)

It’s said she went to the mining of ce and begged they let her stay in the house she was liv- ing in, but since her husband no longer worked for the mine, the mine officials were not going to support her. The woman took her child to the river, and in a t of twisted despair, she drowned her daughter in the creek. Afterward, driven mad by grief and guilt, she went to her home and col- elected her most prized possession: her wedding dress. With it on, she returned to the mining office, sadly, taking her own life on the balcony. tale Carbon County spotlights frequently, please remember that, should you travel to Spring Canyon to try catching a glimpse for yourself, use exercise extreme caution around old mining areas so as not to be harmed in your ghost hunting expeditions. And, for those who don’t dare go without a guide, historical/ ghost tours are also

The legend say she haunts the mine as a har- binger of death, warning the miners of danger so that they and their wives, would never suffer the same fate.

This is just one account from many variations and interestingly enough, each settlement has its own tale with a special twist. Soon these folklores became a cautionary tale for kids, “don’t go outside after dark or the Lady in White will think you’re her baby and take you” and a great spooky story for this season.

While the legend of the White Lady is one tale Carbon County spotlights frequently, please remember that, should you travel to Spring Canyon to try catching a glimpse for yourself, use exercise extreme caution around old mining areas so as not to be harmed in your ghost hunting expeditions. And, for those who don’t dare go without a guide, historical/ ghost tours are also available through The Lonely Miners, Phantom Trains, and History Association.

In the meantime, if you are only curious, there are all sorts of websites and videos that talk more in-depth about the canyon’s history and the roots of the White Lady’s origins. Plus, all you have to do is ask locals and each one can tell you the version they heard growing up. Carbon County is full of spooky nooks and crannies. From tommyknockers to secret tunnels, to ghost stories, these towns have heard it all and continue to remember its history for years to come through the legends and lore passed down to us.

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