Wed. Nov 20th, 2019

Journeys of three women featured in CEU’s Prehistoric Museum

“Faces, Fun and Far Away: Journeys of Three Women” is College of Eastern Utah Prehistoric Museum’s gallery exhibit being displayed in the mezzanine through December. A gallery opening to meet the artists is set for Thursday, Oct. 8 from 6:30-8 p.m.
Hailing from different areas of the United States, Karen Jobe Templeton, Pam Sharp and Arlene Connolly collaborated to unite the three women through their journey in art.

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This archived article was written by: press release

“Faces, Fun and Far Away: Journeys of Three Women” is College of Eastern Utah Prehistoric Museum’s gallery exhibit being displayed in the mezzanine through December. A gallery opening to meet the artists is set for Thursday, Oct. 8 from 6:30-8 p.m.
Hailing from different areas of the United States, Karen Jobe Templeton, Pam Sharp and Arlene Connolly collaborated to unite the three women through their journey in art.
Best known for her Crandall Canyon Mine Memorial Sculpture in Huntington, titled “Heroes Among Us,” Templeton’s is well known in the world of sculpture. Her new “green” studio was built in Helper recently. She works in glass, steel, bronze and resin. Her sculptures are exhibited in galleries throughout the West. She studied portrait sculpture in France and hails from Arizona. She earned a master’s degree in nursing before becoming a full-time sculpture.
Templeton calls her work at the museum, “Slowing Down to See.” “I have always been fascinated by faces – by the fact that we all have the same number of features, yet no two of us are alike. I find that when I slow down enough to sculpt a likeness, there are always surprises in what else can be discovered.
“Faces reveal and hide who we are and what is happening in our lives. My journey is one of fascination and joy of discovery,” Templeton writes.
A native of the state of Washington, Sharp’s horses blend the new West style with Pacific Rim culture that transitions traditional Western horses in a contemporary style. “This fresh style captures both the movements and personality of the horses through bold, bright and vibrant water colors,” she writes.
So much is Sharp’s desire to create; painting is her full-time occupation. Drawing literally from her experience earning a bachelor’s of science degree in zoology, her main goal is to keep the animal anatomy somewhat realistic while creating an attitude with color and lines within the shape. Her journey with form and color has lead to this show, capturing her love of the horse and the colors of her passion that leads into her art themed: “A Journey by Horseback.”
Connolly’s eclectic interests revolve around water color and oil paintings of astronomical wonders, botanicals and landscapes. She uses her scholarly explorations and compulsive surges to culminate in large bodies of work.
She writes, “I visualize the concept of each series going places where many people experience peace of mind, body and soul. I seek to share those discoveries with others through these different creative cycles that have taken me a lifetime to create.” She titled her work, “The Light at the End of the Tunnel, An Artist’s Journey.”
She is a language arts teacher who resides in Price.
The museum is open Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The gallery opening to meet the artists is free and open to the public on Oct. 8. Refreshments will be served.

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