Sat. Oct 19th, 2019

Archeologist studies tree-rings in SE Utah

Studying past human behavior through dating events and variations of the environment of tree rings, encompassed K. Renee Barlow’s latest research.
Barlow, curator of archeology at the College of Eastern Utah Prehistoric Museum, worked with University of Arizona researchers Ronald H. Towner, Matthew W. Salzer and James A. Parks, of the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

This archived article was written by: College of Eastern Utah Museum

Studying past human behavior through dating events and variations of the environment of tree rings, encompassed K. Renee Barlow’s latest research.
Barlow, curator of archeology at the College of Eastern Utah Prehistoric Museum, worked with University of Arizona researchers Ronald H. Towner, Matthew W. Salzer and James A. Parks, of the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research.
She contributed to an article the four wrote, titled, “Assessing the Importance of Past Human Behavior in Dendroarcheological Research: Examples from Range Creek Canyon, Utah, USA.” It was published in the 2009 issue of the journal “Tree-Ring Research.”
“The article discusses tree ring samples we recovered from wood in Fremont granaries, ladders, storage cists, pit houses and masonry towers, and some of the historic log cabins and fences,” she said.
Barlow contributed text, maps and images to the paper that addresses the importance of past human behavior in dendrochaeological (tree-ring) research. She used examples collected from her eight years of studies at Range Creek and Nine-Mile Canyon in Southeastern Utah.
“Other articles about the dendrochronology research and results, and the results of eight years of research on the Range Creek granaries,” she said, “have been submitted to the journals “Utah Archaeology,” “American Antiquity,” and “National Geographic.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email